The story of the bow tie

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1755

The principles of early Victorian fashion limited the possibility of wearing a large and elaborately knotted tie, because they ordered jackets to be fastened high up around the neck. An increasing number of tie-wearing gentlemen claimed, that they cannot spend a long time tying a tie and therefore need a tie, which can be easily and quickly tied, and which will be comfortable and strong at the same time. There was a need for a practical tie, which would not restrict movement, nor was it easy to solve.

Lecturer in physics at the Institute of. Cavendish in the years 1871-1879, the great physicist James Clerk Maxwell
Lecturer in physics at the Institute of. Cavendish in the years 1871-1879, the great physicist James

The result of the above requirements was the emergence of new mutations in the ornaments of the male neck. The end of the 19th century marked the reign of three basic versions: bow ties, ascota i four-in-hand (precursor of modern ties).

In the 17th century, the first forms of bow ties were used to tie the first lace ties. They remained more or less popular throughout the ensuing years 300 years. The roots of the modern bow tie are already visible in Regency ties. The size of the bow tie decreased as its popularity grew, so that at the end of the nineteenth century only two basic varieties remained: "Butterfly" and "bat". These varieties have survived to our times, however, the "butterfly" seems to be more popular. Nowadays, black silk bow ties are sometimes worn with a tuxedo (necessarily black), while stiff white ties for the tailcoat.

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